• Potential short supply of photoinitiators used in printing inks

    Brussels, 4 May 2018
    As has been the case during the past few years, the consistent supply of raw materials remains a concern for ink manufacturers. The latest issue relates to a potential shortage of photoinitiators.

  • Fire hits Huntsman Corporation’s titanium dioxide manufacturing facility in Pori, Finland

    Brussels, 2017-02-14

    News has emerged that the Huntsman Corporation’s titanium dioxide manufacturing facility in Pori, Finland suffered a fire on 30th January 2017, stopping production at the site until repairs can be completed.

  • EuPIA announces availability of updated Good Manufacturing Practice

    Brussels, 8 November 2016

    EuPIA is announcing the availability of its new Good Manufacturing Practice Version 4.0 to further assist in controlling food safety hazards.  This latest edition of the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) has been fully updated and expanded to cover the manufacture of all varnishes and coatings as well as inks designed to be printed on to Food Contact Materials (FCM), including all non-food contact and food contact surfaces of packaging and containers.

  • No Easing Expected at the Price Front

    Brussels, 16 October 2012

    Printing ink manufacturers in Europe are still dealing with difficulties caused by high raw material prices. Costs of chemical supplies needed for the production of printing inks are at an all-time high.

  • Cost situation for printing inks in and from Europe: Raw material costs increase despite low oil prices!

    Brussels, 16 March 2015

    Crucial raw materials for printing inks have become more expensive for European based ink manufacturers due to currency exchange effects.

  • European Coatings Journal: Printing Inks and Varnishes for Food Packaging

    Brussels, April 2013 Food packaging must be manufactured such that it does not transfer its constituents to the packed foodstuffs in quantities which could endanger human health, cause an acceptable change in the composition of the food or inadvertently affect foodstuffs in terms of odour and taste. These general requirements are laid down in the European Framework Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004 on materials and articles intended to come into contact with food.

  • European Coatings Journal: Updated Guideline on Food Packaging Inks & Varnishes

    Brussels, February 2012

    Food packaging must be manufactured such that it does not transfer its constituents to the packed foodstuffs in quantities which could endanger human health, cause an acceptable change in the composition of the food or inadvertently affect foodstuffs in terms of odour and taste. 

  • European Coatings Journal: Less Ups, More Downs

    Venice, 16 March 2012
    In most European countries, the printing ink industry had to cope with shrinking market volumes in the 4th quarter 2011, says Martin Cellerier, Chairman of the EuPIA Statistics Working group (ESWG)

  • European Coatings Journal: EuPIA Annual Conference - 31 March & 1 April 2011, Vienna

    Vienna, 1 April 2011

    "What is the biggest single challenge for the printing ink industry?", Dr Dirk Aulbert, Chairman of the European Printing Ink Association (EuPIA), asked on 31 March, right at the beginning of the two-day Annual Conference 2011 in Vienna/Austria.

    None of the nearly 90 participants seemed to be surprised when the Chairman stated that there was more than one answer to this question.

Dark Clouds on the Horizon for the Printing Ink Industry

Brussels, 5 July 2011

European producers of printing inks are ringing the alarm bells: with resources becoming increasingly scarce, costs continue to escalate to new record levels.

Brussels, 2011-07-05

European producers of printing inks are ringing the alarm bells: with resources becoming increasingly scarce, costs continue to escalate to new record levels.
The producers of printing inks are concerned about staggering rises in commodity prices and very long delivery lead times.
The main reasons for this are the worldwide increase in demand, and significantly reduced production capacities.
EuPIA, the European Printing Ink Association, explains, through its Executive Manager, Martin Kanert, that this affects the most common raw materials, such as titanium dioxide and gum rosin.
In 2010 the EuPIA members had to deal with average price increases of 10% per quarter for titanium dioxide.
In the meantime these increases have reached up to 35% per quarter, and there is still no light at the end of the tunnel. Gum rosin has seen prices increase up to 400% in one year.
EuPIA notes that as a result of the economic crisis, raw material producers have drastically reduced their production capacities.
Less profitable plants were closed and workforces reduced.
The sudden revival of the global economy and the increasing demand from emerging countries mean that the orders now cant be met.
In addition, much of the harvest of reusable vegetable materials used in binders was hit by disastrous weather conditions in China, Pakistan and Russia. The implementation of REACH[1] has a double effect on the supply of raw materials, says Martin Kanert.
On the one hand some commodities disappear off the market altogether, and on the other we see that raw material suppliers from outside Europe do not want to register, and would rather concentrate on their home markets, so the number of suppliers is now limited.
Raw materials make up to 50% of the overall costs in the production of printing inks.
It is therefore inevitable that these higher commodity prices and longer delivery times will have a major impact on the profitability and the resilience of the producing companies.

The manufacturers in the sector remain proactive and concentrate their efforts on the demands of consumers and the increasingly stringent legislation on health and the environment,” explains Martin Kanert.

Manufacturers also make every effort to innovate products on the market that meet statutory requirements and the principles of sustainable development. Industry is concerned, however, that the pressure on margins will slow investment and innovation.

Contact:

Dr. Martin Kanert
Executive Manager of EuPIA
Tel.:     +32 (0)2 676 74 84
Fax:     +32 (0)2 676 74 90
E-Mail:  m.kanert@cepe.org


[1] REACH is the European Community Regulation on chemicals and their safe use. It deals with the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemical substances.

Tremendous Increases in Raw Material Prices and Leadtimes

Brussels, 16 December 2010

Gum Rosin tops the list with a 400% price increase in only 18 months, but other raw materials for the printing inks manufacturers follow close behind.
Especially resins but also pigments are causing major problems through the supply chain with respect to lead-times and prices, declared the European Printing Ink Association (EuPIA) in Brussels.

Brussels, 2010-12-16 – Gum Rosin tops the list with a 400% price increase in only 18 months, but other raw materials for the printing inks manufacturers follow close behind. Especially resins but also pigments are causing major problems through the supply chain with respect to lead-times and prices, declared the European Printing Ink Association (EuPIA) in Brussels.
Gum rosin is an extreme example of what is happening in the supply chain right now. The cost of this renewable raw material remains volatile, currently trading at about $3,000/tonne, and the trend is still upwards.
The availability of this material is extremely tight due to the poor harvests in China which are well below average.
The same is true for nitrocellulose binders which are based on the key ingredient of cotton.
Cotton prices have been increasing sharply due to crop failures in Pakistan, caused by flooding and generally lower yields in other parts of the world.
Organic pigments for the printing ink industry are sourced from China and India where a surge in domestic demand has put limits on the material available for export.
Commodities like titanium dioxide and carbon blacks are also very tight, as a consequence of plant closures and significant increases in demand of these materials.
Printing Ink manufacturers report a daily struggle to secure supplies and of price increases in the region of 10% to 15% in 2010, with further rises of 10% to 15% expected in 2011. “The global availability of raw materials for printing inks continues to be of major concern to our member companies”, says Martin Kanert, Executive Manager of EuPIA. “There is little or no clear outlook as to how long the shortages and product allocations are likely to last”, he says. Following the economic downturn in 2008 many of the commodity suppliers reduced operating capacity, laid off personal and moth-balled or even went as far as permanently shutting plants down.
Inventories were reduced dramatically in 2009 and with the resurgence in demand starting late 2009 and continuing through 2010, many industries were not in the best position to adequately supply their customers.
The supply of pigments has been knocked by mounting environmental challenges and increasing intermediate costs.
“Recently China and India have both announced more stringent environmental rules for the production of pigments”, says Kanert. “On top of this, the energy saving program in China has affected many pigment and pigment intermediate suppliers.
In the end we have to face the situation where ink manufacturers only have minimal control over the cost and supply of the raw materials they need to manufacture their products.
” In some industries new technical developments work against a smooth and trouble-free raw material supply pipeline. Mineral oils, base oils and several solvents are under considerable pressure due to production optimisation and a drive by the refineries for higher margins. These basic chemicals are capacity filler products for the major crude oil companies and were traditionally sold off at low margins.
Many of the older refineries which produced them have now been closed down. “And the modern refineries don’t tend to produce these low volume specials for our printing ink industry”, says Kanert. As a consequence of these market and supply developments all raw material costs for the printing ink manufacturers are, without exception, under extreme upward pressure.
Most significant increases are to be found with the resins of between 10% and 400%, followed by pigments with 10% to 40% increases.

Contact:

Dr. Martin Kanert
Executive Manager of EuPIA
Tel.:     +32 (0)2 676 74 84
Fax:     +32 (0)2 676 74 90
E-Mail:  m.kanert@cepe.org

Exploding Costs for Energy & Raw Materials Seriously Affect the Printing Ink Industry

Brussels, 8 August 2008

The dramatic increase in the cost of raw materials, energy and transportation, seriously impairs the prosperity of the printing ink industry: The costs of raw materials used in the production of inks and varnishes have risen by more than 30% worldwide while oil and natural gas as the most important energy sources are experiencing the fastest inflation in decades.

As a result, the ink industry is forced to react to this situation says the European Printing Ink Association (EuPIA).

Brussels, 8 August 2008The dramatic increase in the cost of raw materials, energy and transportation, seriously impairs the prosperity of the printing ink industry: The costs of raw materials used in the production of inks and varnishes have risen by more than 30% worldwide while oil and natural gas as the most important energy sources are experiencing the fastest inflation in decades. As a result, the ink industry is forced to react to this situation says the European Printing Ink Association (EuPIA).

The serious situation regarding Printing Ink raw materials and intermediates is in part caused by a combination of two major problems: A greater demand for these materials, especially in emerging markets, and the high crude oil price that drives the cost of most of these materials up. In addition this twin effect coincides with shortfalls in production following environmental restrictions imposed by the Chinese government ahead of the Olympic Games in Beijing.
Based both on these restrictions, and those that the Chinese government applied to chemical manufacturers last year in order to generally control environmental impacts, experts believe that this situation will not be reversed after the Olympic Games, but will remain a major impact factor for the future. As a consequence major worldwide chemical corporations and producers of pigments and intermediates have already put into action, or announced, price increases of 10 to 30% for their products with immediate effect. Emerging markets, including India and China, whilst also affected by the slowdown of the US economy, still have an extremely strong domestic demand for materials and goods. As in the past, ink producers will continue and reinforce their efforts of absorbing higher costs through internal rationalisation measures, improving recipes and increasing efficiency.
However, it must be realised that now costs are escalating faster and in greater numbers than ever, without any short-term relief in sight.

Contact:

Dr. Martin Kanert
Executive Manager of EuPIA
Tel.: +32 (0)2 676 74 84
Fax: +32 (0)2 676 74 90
E-Mail: m.kanert@cepe.org